click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CNN 9
CNNW 9
CSPAN 4
KQED (PBS) 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CSPAN2 3
WETA 3
KRCB (PBS) 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
MSNBC 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 47
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)
-span.org. >> john brennan unveiled unused counterterrorism strategy and pakistan -- on velde a and new counter-terrorism strategy on pakistan -- unveiled a new counterterrorism strategy for pakistan. this is about one hour, 50 minutes. >> have never heard it so quiet. that is a sense of our anticipation and excitement about our program today. we welcome you. many on and guests, dear student, faculty, others, we are pleased and honored to host john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security and terrorism -- counter- terrorism. it introduced are speaker, we have the perfect person right here in our community. prof. john mclaughlin is a member of our faculty, holding the position of distinguish practitioner at the philip merrill center for strategic studies. as many of you know, john had a highly distinguished career as a central event -- at the central intelligence agency. beginning in 1972 car racing to the rank of deputy director, acting director in two dozen for. no one could have a keener appreciation of the challenges facing our speaker every day. professor, prepared -- t
pakistan's spy agency to run an illegal lobbying operation. officials instructed him to make campaign donations to congress and develop sources at the white house and the state department. prosecutors charged another united states citizen, of recruiting people to funnel money to the organization but he is in pakistan. and now the news from washington, dc, steve. what do we know of the defendants? >>reporter: the high profile figure was the head of a lobbying group that promoted pakistan in the dispute with india over the fate of kashmir. he was often seen in public meeting and greeting members of congress and donating money and told the f.b.i. he had no connection to the pakistani government but an f.b.i. affidavit refers to a witness who says he, the witness, participated to obscure the origin of money transfers by the pakistani intelligence agency to this man to use as a lobbyist to influence the interests of the government of pakistan. he appeared in court in alexandria, virginia. the law that was violated was being unregistered agent of a foreign government. plenty of people in wa
frankly operates a bit like the military in pakistan. it is a state within a state. they have their own economy and they had their own businesses and their revolution as it exists in egypt, the uprising as it exists, whatever you want to call it, has not yet focused on what will be that future role of this pebble in the room. the floor is open. yes. direct your question to somebody. push it up on the side, i think. [inaudible] the question is about yemen. when we talk about the arab spring and the uprising -- i would also like to hear little bit more about georgia. that seemed to be a key in the region. >> margot and david white at you say something about jordan and yemen. why would you start on yemen, the uprising of the yemen that has been going on for about a decade. and it has involved people from south yemen that are not too happy about the union of the two yemen's and the short end of the stick that they got. its minorities in the north near the saudi border that have had a revolution going on for several years and the tribal disputes. so there has been a long-standing conflict. d
operations in pakistan? >> let me say a couple things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined that we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated groups to dismantle, disrupt and ultimately defeat them. we've been doing that successfully. and we're going to continue these efforts and these efforts are focus the on al qaeda central and south asia but also focused on affiliates around the world, number one. number two, we have the capability to continue this. without commenting on the story that you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can continue this, that we will continue this effort at a pace in an intensity that will allow to us put al qaeda -- continue to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect to the pakistanis. the pakistanis, fareed, and the united states have a complicated relationship, as you know. there will be frustrations and disagreements. we remained engaged with the pakistanis for a number of very important reasons related to our national security and ultimately their se
much, much harder on the diplomatic front with afghanistan, pakistan, and the rest of the region. >> i think a formal accord would be desirable, i agree entirely. even so, it would probably be a fig leaf rather than an actual settlement to the problem there. if we don't get it or can't get it, that shouldn't stop us from going away. >> one of the things you point out in the piece which i thought was very striking was that there was all this opposition and huge intense opposition in this country to the bombing of cambodia because that was seen as crossing an international border. of course, we do that every week now in our drone attacks in pakistan which is it functionally exactly the same thing? pakistan has become a safe haven just as cambodia was and we follow in hot pursuit as it were. >> anyone who's watched a war movie, when you have a tactical retreat, you leave one guy behind to cover and shoot. the other people go away. that's what you have to do militarily on the ground even as we're pulling out our forces, we should be striking hard and aggressively so the enemy can't follow
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
the pakistan border. this is a critical area for the insurgents and the cross border infiltration and this is a historic avenue for movement from pakistan into afghanistan. in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how will you characterize this? >> there is a significant amount of influx of insurgent fighters in the area, mostly from pakistan moving into afghanistan. >> tell us a little bit about your mission. >> this the standard reconnaissance mission, along the historic route from pakistan. the terrain is inaccessible, so we are going there to see what this looks like for a future clearing operation. the major challenges the terrain, which is extreme and very difficult to move. and also, the people there have not seen the coalition presence in some time. >> what do you hope to achieve to the mission. >> to accept these conditions for future operations and build our awareness of the atmosphere, so that we can continue the operations there. this is for the clear insurgent presence in the area. >> how do you tell if you have succeeded? >> the numbers that occur in the area, we have re
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
pipeline, iran-pakistan-india. the u.s. state department stood up and said, this is not going to happen. does it go through anyway as a litmus test? >> i think what was unfortunate is the problem between india and pakistan, that they didn't want -- on continuedian side to rely on the gas on going through pakistan. they thought maybe it should be offshore and so on. i think as far as iran and pakistan is concerned or the two are concerned, the deal is going quite a long way ahead on the iranian side. on the pakistani side there is so many announcements. of course, over 20 years, announcements are announcements, but they seem a bit more serious. >> pipeline politics indeed. it's become a major source of contention between lebanon and israel. they're warning israel to stay away from the country's energy resources but leaders of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet u
panetta visited in afghanistan. he failed to visit pakistan. what do you think that says about the tension? >> the tension is quite high. frankly unless there is some reversal and lowering of the rhetoric, then i think it's going to spin in a very deep decline. that's not something that's in pakistan's interest on the united states. you need to keep conversations as private as possible sending very strong messages but if we continue to vent our frustrations mutual frustrations ours with the pakistanis and what they have done and fail to do theirs with us in terms of us trying to micro manage what they're doing, then your going to have a break or breach in that relationship. pakistan is a major non-nato ally. allies don't allow things to happen like the hosting of the con sealing of bin laden or the arresting of those who help take bin laden down or allegedly the targeting for assassination of a journalist who's been critical of the regime. these are not the acts of allies. we've got to get back to a level of respect and trust i think that's lacking right now. as a result the relationship i
military operations in pakistan? >> a couple of things about that. number one, from the outset of the administration we determined we would launch an aggressive, focused, relentless effort on al qaeda and associated group to disrupt and dismantle them and we have been doing that successfully. the ranks have been decimated as the president said in his speech in afghanistan. and we will continue these efforts. these efforts are focused on al qaeda central in south asia and affiliates around the world. number two. we have the capability to continue to do this. and without commenting on the story you have outlined here, i have every confidence we can and will continue this effort at a pace and intensity that will allow us to put al qaeda on the road to defeat with respect -- with respect to the pakistanis, there is a complicated relationship and there are frustrations and disagreements. we remain engaged with the pakistanis for a number of important reasons related to our national security and i think their ultimate security. they are an important counterterrorism partner for the u
into jens, the best intelligence we've gotten since tora bora that he was in abbottabad pakistan, we acted yuan laal ratly and took h out and appropriately so. we do work through the united nations in a variety of places in order, like on the sanctions regimes, on iran and north korea. but we have, as i said at the outset, really undertake aggressively... you know, the first triple trip obama... president obama tk outside the united states was in april, 2009 was to europe for a set of sum rk teixeiras and then to turkey. and understanding that these rising powers, these relationships are important for problem solving, particularly in a place like the middle east. we have had disagreements with the turks over the last three years. >> rose: what are those disagreements? >> we had a disagreement with the turks over tactics around the iranian sanctions resolution. and they thought... >> rose: this is turkey and brazil together because of their response? >> yes. and we... >> rose: they thought they were doing your bidding, you understand that? >> i understand a lot about it. and... but, in fact
against pakistan for the selling in the last couple of weeks -- 50 people killed in afghanistan. what is the situation over there ? >> i don't have anything specific on that issue. i will tell you that our own strategic dialogue at the working level continues with pakistan on a broad range of issues. we have assistant secretary brownfield today or tomorrow continuing our law enforcement and counternarcotics dialogue with pakistan. we continue to work the full range of security and law enforcement and stability issues with pakistan. >> and just to follow up on the same issue, there was a quote that u.s. believe go that i.s.a. was involved in the killing of the pakistani journalist. do you agree with that? >> i'm not going to speak to any intelligence issues obviously from this podium. i will say that when this incident occurred back in may, we issued a very strong statement and i will repeat today that we strongly condemn the abduction and killing of reporters and we have raised our concerns with this case with the pakistanis. >> do you believe this is an act of terrorism, the killing
and influenced china in term which influenced india which may be influencing pakistan. that same pattern may be beginning to happen in africa as we have some real success stories in other countries thinking if rwanda can do it, why can't we? >> we'll have to leave it at that. thank you very much. we will be right back. >> if i can finish now -- oh, yes, why don't you meow when i woman does that. between accoun, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. >>> canada pulled the last of the combat troops out of afghanistan this week. this brings us to our question of the week. how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assistance force? is it a, 6, b, 16, c, 26 or d 46. stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. go to cnn.com/gps for ten more questions. while yo
of the key leadership within al-qaeda, both in pakistan as well as in yemen and other areas that if we can be successful at going after them, i think we can really undermind their ability. >> the former cia director and other afghan officials discuss the plan to pull american troops. president obama wants to bring about 10,000 troops back home this year and 23,000 more next year. >> the key to success in afghanistan is the ability to successfully transition to the afghans. >> the secretary meeting with general david patraeus. the top u.s. commander in afghanistan. general patraeus leaves his post this month to head to the cia. he too says al-qaeda is now on the run. >> there has been enormous damage done to al-qaeda in the federal administer triable areas. that's above and beyond the killing of osama bin laden. >> secretary panetta plans to meet with them before leaving afghanistan. fox news. >> the crisis in syria appears to be showing signs of hope. the u.s. ambassador to syria showed solidarity with antigovernment protesters by joining a gathering about 150 miles outside of the ca
influenced india, which may be influencing pakistan. that same pattern may be beginning to happen in africa, as we have some real success stories, and others countries say, if rwanda can do it, if ghana can do it, why can't we? >> we'll have to leave it at that. thank you very much. >>> we will be right back. woman: saving for our child's college fund was getting expensive. man: yes it was. so to save some money, we taught our 5 year old how to dunk. woman: scholarship! woman: honey go get him. anncr: there's an easier way to save. get online. go to geico.com. get a quote. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. >>> can a day pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan this week. that brings us to our question of the week -- how many nations still have combat troops in afghanistan as part of the international security assist tansz force? is it 6, 16, 26 or 46? stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer. make sure you go to cnn.com/gps for ten more question and make sure you check out the global public square don't forget, you can also follow us on twitter and fac
. outpost caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, then every few days, this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic. they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are getting attacked from all sides. >> come on, hustle up. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming fortal ban talibae hills. but the incoming fire is very accurate here. >> go, go, go! >> reporter: they arrange cover from heavy machine guns. but the bullets are too close. locals scatter. just before huge american fire power has the last word. four massive air strikes across the hills and then the taliban fall silent. america knew why it came here, but isn't sure why it's staying. >> can we get like a police call for like cigarette butts? >> absolutely. >> reporter: ten minutes later, jets swoop into strafe the hills. a show of force for the taliban are now either gone or dead, at least five killed by the soldiers count. the next morning, it
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
. we had the times square bomber inspired by them and had trained with the taliban in pakistan. yes, there are broader links but there are a few things at work here. number 1 a crippling political correctness, absolutely crippling. i think another thing, quite frankly, is that it's very difficult -- say that islam is not a religion of peace. say shari'a is a threat, that's a very difficult thing to come to grips with because that means you're at good with a good slice of the muslim population who does follow muslim fundamentally. who does follow shari'a to the t. that's a scary thing to admit for our government. >> host: and i want to go back to that because no less a person than george bush right after 9/11 said islam is a religion of peace. right after the young comes vo radical muslim walked into the airport in frankfurt and shot a couple of american soldiers, barack obama said one of the islam is one of the world's great religions. my sense we want to believe that because we are a tolerant people. but you've got quotes in this book from several known terrorists and conspirators
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen, and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. has long said it believes al qaeda remains very interested in high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. apparently, osama bin laden was even talking about assembling a team of operatives. but of course, those navy s.e.a.l.s killed him in the compound before he could carry out the plan any further. >> general petraeus, i take it is getting ready to leave afghanistan, heading over to the cia? >> very soon. in fact, the change of command ceremony that will turn everything over in afghanistan to marine corps general john allen will take place monday morning in kabul. petraeus will get on a plane, come back to the united states, retire from years of service in the active duty army, and, in fact, in the coming weeks will do exactly that. take over
into the gulf of oman, towards pakistan. it is very important. these two monarchies have done everything possible to crush any sign or effort of reform or agitation for reform. in the case of the saudi arabia, there were quite successful in doing this. some of the liberal saudis tried to have a so-called day of raids on march 11. -- a so-called day of rage on march 11. exactly one person showed up in riyadh. that person was swamped by journalists. but 17,000 people had signed up on the facebook page to come out and participate in the day of rage. some shiites in the eastern province show that the day before and had their demonstration. but, basically, the saudis have been able to mobilize not only the threat of security forces cracking down on anybody who demonstrates, the got the religious establishment making any kind of demonstrations religiously forbidden. they put pressure on families to keep their kids at home. and they succeeded. in the case of bahrain, it was much more messy, and you have a shiite majority there of 70% may become a 65% to 75%. and they were on their way to probab
the border with pakistan. this is an area they could turn over. they are doing it and it's a test case. canadians ceased their combat operations last week. they are going to replace their combat troops with 950 trainers. everybody is looking at the exit since the united states announceded we're pulling out. >> jamie: 10,000 of our troops will leave at the end of this year. and that has begun. how is it going? >> it's too early to tell. what happened is 650 troops left. they will not be replaced. that is the first increment of the 10,000 that you mentioned. so it will be, hopefully it will be more of a gradual reduction, so that we can meter the troops out as we take account of what is really happening on the ground. >> jamie: several generals recommended a slower withdrawal schedule than what president obama wants and is currently going to get. do you think we'll hear from them again? or in the military way will they just do what they have been asked to do? >> the thing about the military professionals, you have two options. you can execute the orders as best you can or resign. you don
Search Results 0 to 46 of about 47 (some duplicates have been removed)